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Posts for: June, 2018

By Thomas Family Dental
June 29, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay  
ToothDecaycanbeLessofaProblemwithMinimallyInvasiveDentistry

“Less is more” is a truism for much of life. It’s also an important feature of an emerging approach to treating tooth decay known as minimally invasive dentistry (MID).

MID updates another revolution in dental care that occurred in the early 1900s. Treating decay took a quantum leap thanks to techniques developed by Dr. G. V. Black, considered the father of modern dentistry. Dr. Black’s approach (known as “extension for prevention”) involved not only removing decayed tooth structure, but also adjacent areas deemed vulnerable to decay, which made them easier to clean. On the downside, though, it also created larger than normal fillings.

As the practice prevailed through much of the Twentieth Century another weakness became apparent—the approach could not guarantee a treated tooth would not experience decay again. This became the real impetus toward MID—to find more comprehensive ways to treat decay with as little impact on the tooth structure as possible.

These efforts received a real boost from emerging technology. This was especially true in diagnostics with the rise of new devices like intraoral cameras and techniques like laser fluorescence that can enable dentists to detect decay much earlier. It’s now possible to catch the disease at an earlier stage before substantial damage to the tooth occurs.

MID has also led to new treatments that preserve more of the tooth structure. Traditional drilling is increasingly giving way to air abrasion, the use of a fine particle stream of aluminum oxide, glass beads or baking soda directed precisely at decayed structure and minimizing damage to healthy structure. We’re also using new filling materials like composite resin for restorations after treatment that are strong yet still life-like and attractive.

We also can’t forget the role of the twin daily hygiene practices brushing and flossing to remove bacterial plaque, the main source of dental disease. And regular dental cleanings and checkups round out the MID approach, helping to ensure that decay doesn’t get too far. The end result of this revolutionary approach: your teeth can experience less impact from treatment and remain healthier and more attractive in the long-run.

If you would like more information on minimally invasive dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Minimally Invasive Dentistry: When Less Care is more.”


By Thomas Family Dental
June 19, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth pain  
Where-andHow-DoesitHurtGettingtotheSourceofToothPain

Although toothaches are common, not all tooth pain originates from the same source. But regardless of its cause, you need to take prompt action to find out and begin treatment.

Sensitive teeth, for example, usually cause a quick stab of pain when you eat or drink something hot or cold or when you bite down. If the pain lasts only a second or two, you may have a small area of decay in a tooth, a loose filling or an exposed root. The latter often occurs either because of over-aggressive brushing or periodontal (gum) disease. In both cases, the gums may have shrunk back or receded to expose the root surface.

A sharp pain when biting down may be a sign of decay or a loose filling; it could also mean you have a fractured or cracked tooth. For any of those causes, you'll need treatment to repair the problem and relieve the pain.

You may also experience a lingering tooth pain ranging from dull to sharp, or localized to one tooth or seeming to radiate from a general area, such as above the upper jaw. There are a number of possible causes, but two prominent ones are an abscess (a localized area of infection that's become inflamed) or deep decay within the pulp, the heart of a tooth.

This usually calls for a root canal treatment for the affected tooth. In this procedure we drill an access hole into the pulp and clear it of infected and dead tissue. We then fill the empty pulp chamber and root canals with a special filling and seal the access hole. Later, we bond a permanent artificial crown to the tooth to further protect it from re-infection.

Whether your pain is momentary or lingering, dull or sharp, you should see us as soon as possible to determine its cause. You should still see us even if sharp, lingering pain goes away — this could simply mean the infected nerves in the pulp have died but not the infection. The sooner you have the cause of your pain treated, the better your chances of a happy and less costly outcome.

If you would like more information on tooth pain and what to do about it, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Pain? Don't Wait!


FourTipsforPreventingPrematureLossofBabyTeethFromToothDecay

Most often, all of your child’s primary teeth will eventually be replaced by permanent teeth, but you shouldn’t consider them less important — there are serious consequences for losing a primary tooth prematurely. Besides providing a means for a child to chew food and speak clearly, primary teeth also save space for the permanent teeth to erupt; a premature loss could lead to malocclusions (bad bites) that may result in costly orthodontic treatment later.

That’s why it’s important to fight tooth decay in primary teeth. By keeping them healthy and in place until it’s time for their departure, their permanent replacements have a better chance of erupting into their proper positions.

Here are 4 tips for preventing tooth decay in primary teeth:

Begin daily oral hygiene when teeth first appear. Begin brushing with fluoride toothpaste as soon as the first primary teeth come in. Brushing removes bacterial plaque, the primary cause of tooth decay, and fluoride strengthens enamel. Because they tend to swallow toothpaste rather than spit it out, use just a smear of toothpaste for infants and toddlers, and a pea-sized amount for ages two and older.

Start regular dental visits by the child’s first birthday. By beginning regular checkups around age 1, we’ll have a better chance of discovering developing tooth decay or other problems early. You’re also setting a good foundation for what should be a lifelong habit for optimum dental health.

Limit sugar consumption. The oral bacteria that cause tooth decay feed on leftover carbohydrates like sugar, so you should limit intake especially between meals. One culprit to watch out for: a bedtime bottle filled with formula, milk or fruit juices, all of which contain carbohydrates (sugar). Water or no bottle at all is a better alternative.

Consider topical fluoride or sealants for extra protection. In some circumstances, we may advise protecting the enamel of newly erupted teeth with an applied sealant. These protective coatings fill in porous pits and fissures in young teeth to deny access to disease. Supplemental fluoride will further strengthen young tooth enamel.

Taking these measures and remaining vigilant to the first signs of decay can go a long way toward preserving your child’s teeth. Their future oral health depends on it.

If you would like more information on dental care for children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dentistry & Oral Health for Children.”